What is the bird flu?

 

   
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Recognizing bird flu in poultry / humans

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How is the bird flu transmitted?

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Can other animals than birds be infected with the bird flu?

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Worst case scenario

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How to deal with the bird flu

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Nanosilver effect on virus

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Nanocid application in poltry training

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Nanocid productions have the following specialties

Avian influenza is an infectious disease of birds caused by type A strains of the influenza virus. All birds are thought to be susceptible to infection with avian influenza, though some species are more resistant to infection than others. Migratory waterfowl – most notably wild ducks – are the natural reservoir of avian influenza viruses, and these birds are also the most resistant to infection. Domestic poultry, including chickens, ducks, and turkeys, are particularly susceptible to epidemics of rapidly fatal influenza. There are many different subtypes of type A influenza viruses. Influenza A viruses are constantly changing, and they might adapt over time to infect and spread among humans.

 

Recognizing bird flu in poultry / humans

Infection causes a wide spectrum of symptoms in birds, ranging from mild illness to a highly contagious and rapidly fatal disease resulting in severe epidemics. The latter is known as “highly pathogenic avian influenza”. This form is characterized by sudden onset, severe illness, and rapid death, with a mortality that can approach 100%.

How is the bird flu transmitted?

Avian influenza viruses do not normally infect species other than birds and pigs. The first documented infection of humans with an avian influenza virus occurred in Hong Kong in 1997, when the H5N1 strain caused severe respiratory disease in 18 humans, of whom 6 died. The infection of humans coincided with an epidemic of highly pathogenic avian influenza, caused by the same strain, in Hong Kong’s poultry population.
Extensive investigation of that outbreak determined that close contact with live infected poultry was the source of human infection. Studies at the genetic level further determined that the virus had jumped directly from birds to humans. Limited transmission to health care workers occurred, but did not cause severe disease.
Infected birds shed flu virus in their saliva, nasal secretions, and feces. Susceptible birds become infected when they have contact with contaminated excretions or surfaces that are contaminated with excretions. It is believed that most cases of bird flu infection in humans have resulted from contact with infected poultry or contaminated surfaces. The spread of avian influenza viruses from one ill person to another has been reported very rarely, and transmission has not been observed to continue beyond one person.

Can other animals than birds be infected with the bird flu?

Conditions favorable for the emergence of antigenic shift have long been thought to involve humans living in close proximity to domestic poultry and pigs. Because pigs are susceptible to infection with both avian and mammalian viruses, including human strains, they can serve as a “mixing vessel” for the scrambling of genetic material from human and avian viruses, resulting in the emergence of a novel subtype. Recent events, however, have identified a second possible mechanism. Evidence is mounting that, for at least some of the 15 avian influenza virus subtypes circulating in bird populations, humans themselves can serve as the “mixing vessel”.

Worst case scenario

All type A influenza viruses, including those that regularly cause seasonal epidemics of influenza in humans, are genetically labile and well adapted to elude host defenses. Influenza viruses lack mechanisms for the “proofreading” and repair of errors that occur during replication. As a result of these uncorrected errors, the genetic composition of the viruses changes as they replicate in humans and animals, and the existing strain is replaced with a new antigenic variant. These constant, permanent and usually small changes in the antigenic composition of influenza A viruses are known as antigenic “drift”.
Influenza viruses have a second characteristic of great public health concern: influenza A viruses, including subtypes from different species, can swap or “reassort” genetic materials and merge. This resentment process, known as antigenic “shift”, results in a novel subtype different from both parent viruses. As populations will have no immunity to the new subtype, and as no existing vaccines can confer protection, antigenic shift has historically resulted in highly lethal pandemics. For this to happen, the novel subtype needs to have genes from human influenza viruses that make it readily transmissible from person to person for a sustainable period.

How to deal with the bird flu

The quarantining of infected farms and destruction of infected or potentially exposed flocks are standard control measures aimed at preventing spread to other farms and eventual establishment of the virus in a country’s poultry population. Apart from being highly contagious, avian influenza viruses are readily transmitted from farm to farm by mechanical means, such as by contaminated equipment, vehicles, feed, cages, or clothing. Highly pathogenic viruses can survive for long periods in the environment, especially when temperatures are low. Stringent sanitary measures on farms can, however, confer some degree of protection.
The H5N1 virus currently infecting birds in Asia that has caused human illness and death is resistant to amantadine and rimantadine, two antiviral medications commonly used for influenza. Two other antiviral medications, oseltamavir and zanamavir, would probably work to treat flu caused by the H5N1 virus, but additional studies still need to be done to prove their effectiveness.
There currently is no commercially available vaccine to protect humans against the H5N1 virus that is being seen in Asia and Europe . However, vaccine development efforts are taking place. Research studies to test a vaccine to protect humans against H5N1 virus began in April 2005, and a series of clinical trials is underway.

Nanosilver effect on virus

How does it kill pathogens Now we are getting into an area that is not nearly as clear cut as the above. That is does kill microbes, and disable viruses is a fact, but how does it is still up to dispute. The following are some theories Silver particles are an oxidizing catalyst, and as such oxidize pathogens killing them . This is how H2O2 works as well Silver interferes with the microbe's respiration Silver  ties up or disables the sulfur in the microbe Silver short out the electrostatic fields in the cell Most of the above would not apply to viruses though. Instead the possibilities for disabling viruses are Silver particles are an oxidizing catalyst and oxidize the virus killing it Silver causes the virus DNA or RNA to revert back to being undifferentiated ,and without the proper expression for that host is disabled Silver repairs the broken (segment of) DNA of a virus, making it complete , but no longer a functional virus which by design has an incomplete DNA

Nanocid application in poltry training

Nanocid colloid and composite that are produced based on Nanosilver particles , have vast properties for applying in industries related to training and keeping all kinds of birds , in this regards we can list the following:

  1. Antimicrobial filters of water filtration and sterilization of required grain for birds.

  2. Strilization and antimicrobialize all surfaces and aviculture walls.     more...

  3. Antimicrobial filters for aviculture air filtration.

  4. Antimicrobial clothes and equipment used by workers.     more...

  5. Strilizatrion of birds transportation equipment.

  6. Antimicrobial equipment used in slaughter house and sterilization of all surfaces.

  7. Antimicrobial packages.     more...

Nanocid productions have the following specialties:

  1. Using these materials for preventing contagious diseases such as bird flu.

  2. Nonchemical base of these materials and agreeable with environment.

  3. Filtration of volatile organic compounds (V.O.C) and all kinds of bacteria's and microbes in air.

  4. Very low dosages of products for achieving above goals is needed.

  5. Excellent operation in different PH and temperatures.

  6. Lack of creating resistance in all bacteria's and microbes.

  7. high stability.

step

explanation

Applicable material

concentration

How to do

Sterilization of machinery After evacuation, cleansing and washing completely nanocid

100 ppm (0.1%)

Direct spray

Sterilization of cloths

After washing and making dry completely nanocid

200 ppm (0.2%)

Deep the cloths after washing and making dry completely
Sterilization of wadding material After changing nanocid 100 ppm

Direct spray

Primitive sterilization of saloon

After primary cleansing of wastes

nanocid 100 ppm Spray on all surfaces and spaces
Equipment and appliance

After washing and cleansing

nanocid 100 ppm Deep in colloid for 15 min or complete spray
Complete sterilization of saloon

After washing and cleansing

nanocid 100 ppm Spray on all surfaces and spaces
Sterilization of entrance pond

After washing and cleansing

nanocid 100 ppm Daily charged
Sterilization of workers hands

After primitive cleansing

Antibacterial gel

20 ppm  

Consumption water

Daily charged with half of dose

nanocid

0.5 ppm (0.005%)

 

Sterilization of saloon space during presence of chickens

Daily in epidemic periods

nanocid

50 ppm (0.05%)

spray

References:
www.silver-lightning.com
www.pandemic.info

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